Netflix and Kill Me

User avatar
mharr
Posts: 1271
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2016 11:54 am
Location: UK

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby mharr » Thu Jun 10, 2021 6:46 pm

Blossom wrote:Neil Gaiman has a long history of saying very progressive-sounding things on social media, and then doing some Rough Shit in his actual work and life.

Like giving speeches about how artists should reject being undervalued and expect actual no-shit payment for their work until Amanda wanted his fans to make her a bunch of free shit for the exposure?

User avatar
Blossom
Posts: 2268
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 8:58 pm

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby Blossom » Thu Jun 10, 2021 8:27 pm

Let's not forget boosting the crowdfunds of people who wanted to raise money to pay for his Master Class writing videos.
Image

User avatar
Thad
Posts: 9378
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:05 am
Location: 1611 Uranus Avenue
Contact:

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby Thad » Sat Jun 12, 2021 3:35 pm

mharr wrote:
Blossom wrote:Neil Gaiman has a long history of saying very progressive-sounding things on social media, and then doing some Rough Shit in his actual work and life.

Like giving speeches about how artists should reject being undervalued and expect actual no-shit payment for their work until Amanda wanted his fans to make her a bunch of free shit for the exposure?

I'm more inclined to lay that at her feet than his.

Now, flying to a different hemisphere because you and your wife had a fight, violating quarantine during a pandemic, and then spending the next several months publicly being Very Sad that you can't see her and your son? That reflects not just extremely poor judgement, but the rarefied sort of total disconnect from reality that's only accessible to the rich and famous.

(Though I guess at least by celebrity breakdown standards, that's pretty mild.)

User avatar
zaratustra
Posts: 1565
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:45 pm

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby zaratustra » Sun Jun 13, 2021 1:13 pm

Neil Gaiman's work was an important stepping stone in inclusivity in comics, but the thing about stepping stones is that you move on to the next one.

And believe me, there is only so much well-off white dudes on their late thirties can say about society.

User avatar
Mongrel
Posts: 16100
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:28 pm
Location: Canadumb

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby Mongrel » Sun Jun 13, 2021 1:37 pm

zaratustra wrote:And believe me, there is only so much well-off white dudes on their late thirties can say about society.


Oh I dunno. Seems to me like there's no limits whatsoever on what a middle-aged white guy might say about society. :V
Image

User avatar
nosimpleway
Posts: 3238
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 7:31 pm

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby nosimpleway » Sun Jun 13, 2021 1:48 pm

...we live in a society?

User avatar
Thad
Posts: 9378
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:05 am
Location: 1611 Uranus Avenue
Contact:

Re: Netflix and Kill Me

Postby Thad » Sun Jun 13, 2021 2:21 pm

zaratustra wrote:Neil Gaiman's work was an important stepping stone in inclusivity in comics, but the thing about stepping stones is that you move on to the next one.

And believe me, there is only so much well-off white dudes on their late thirties can say about society.

I think all that's true, but in the context of TV, I think he's still got some use as a stepping stone. As risk-averse as comics publishers are, TV studios are much moreso. They love their Brands, their known quantities, and when they've got a couple of Brands like Sandman and Neil Gaiman, they see that as offsetting the risks of things like hiring black and queer people. (To be clear, I'm not endorsing the notion that inclusion is risky; I think that's absurd. But I think that's still very much the way studio execs think.)

And while comics is certainly a collaborative medium, TV is, of course, moreso. Gaiman's not even the showrunner (though he apparently does have some pretty significant influence on the production), and obviously the production's going to involve a whole lot of other people in the cast and crew.

From what we've seen of the cast, at least, it looks like the show's taking diversity seriously, and I think it's probably safe to say that in terms of representation among the cast, at least, it's more reflective of 2021 than 1989. Hopefully that's the case in the writers' room and elsewhere too.

As for the final product, and how far it moves past the source material? That very much remains to be seen. I think we're seeing some positive signs so far, but I agree that there are a lot of things to be wary of, and A Doll's House is right at the top of the list.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests